Roger Deakins

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  • in reply to: Alexa Mini LF #199631
    Roger Deakins
    Keymaster

      My M8 with its original sensor seems totally fine but the sensor on my monochrome M9 de laminated. But the upgrade sensor is very nice and the M9 is my favorite camera.

      in reply to: Lighting setup workflow #199626
      Roger Deakins
      Keymaster

        I will sometimes adjust my lighting after I watch a camera rehearsal and I might make a few more ‘tweaks’ between takes. I think that is part of the process, and especially so when you are seeing an actor in costume and make up for the first time. But when shooting some actors, or some particularly delicate scenes, you know that it is better to compromise and shoot. There is a balance and many more people are involved in creating the end result than just you. Any time you step onto a film set and look through a camera it involves some sort of personal compromise.

        It has happened that I felt the need to make a large adjustment to a lighting set up. But its also happened that the director or I will discover a ‘better’ camera shot. Or, maybe the actor will find an entirely different way to play the scene and then everything changes! But its all part of the process of exploration we go through.

         

         

        in reply to: Moon light peacock blue vs context #198470
        Roger Deakins
        Keymaster

          There are no rules. When do you think it distracts? You c]an see from my work when I have used a ‘blue moonlight’ and where I have avoided it. Its about personal taste.

          Roger Deakins
          Keymaster

            That is an interesting question. There was a distinct shift in the shadows when you pulled an 85 and shot a tungsten balanced stock in daylight. I did this throughout ‘Shawshank’ but only for specific scenes of other films. As I understand it the Alexa was, originally, more sensitive to blue light. I certainly did some side by side tests before I shot my first film with an Alexa but I found little, if any, discernible difference between shooting for a tungsten and daylight balance.

            in reply to: Building a tunnel of diffusion #197339
            Roger Deakins
            Keymaster

              I don’t remember the specific material. I used it on ‘Shawshank’ so that was a long time ago. Tarp might well be too dense but that will depend on what lights you have. What I was thinking of was equivalent to a 216 or even less dense than that.

              in reply to: Alexa Mini LF #196637
              Roger Deakins
              Keymaster

                Don’t see any reason for the LF to be thrown out. I have a Leica M8 stills camera, which has a smaller sensor and less resolution than the M9, for instance, but it continues to produce good images – if I point it in the right direction.

                in reply to: Blade Runner Eyeball #196635
                Roger Deakins
                Keymaster

                  That was a bit of a cheat as we removed the reflection. I used a large bounce and it just crept into the top of the eye.

                  in reply to: Building a tunnel of diffusion #195987
                  Roger Deakins
                  Keymaster

                    You could make hoops of 1″ plastic pipe to hold up a ‘tunnel’ of diffusion. There is a white industrial plastic that is equivalent to a 216 diffusion and comes in a wide roll. I used this on a film when I needed a lot of diffusion, instead of paying far more for something from a film supply company. You could rent seamless grid cloths or silks, which might be the cheapest option.

                    in reply to: Alexa 65 questions #195986
                    Roger Deakins
                    Keymaster

                      I did look a the 65 when it first came out but I have never used on on a film. Maybe, but I am now a fan of the LF and prefer the depth of field of that format.

                      in reply to: Diffusion for exterior day scenes #195984
                      Roger Deakins
                      Keymaster

                        I have used a lamp a time or two but I usually use some sort of bounce material. When I have projected a lamp through diffusion I have used a half or a full grid cloth.

                        in reply to: Empire of Light – Practical Bare Bulb #193025
                        Roger Deakins
                        Keymaster

                          There was just the one bulb and no other light. There was a serious flare but I placed a small square of white tape in the middle of the bulb facing camera and that dealt with the flare. The source was so hot that the tape pretty much disappeared and I took out the rest in the DI.

                          in reply to: Stuart Orme / Genesis #190933
                          Roger Deakins
                          Keymaster

                            Ahh! I seem to remember the video involved Phil Collins wearing a large Mexican hat. Long time ago and I think I shot a couple of videos with Stuart.

                            in reply to: Colors/Tone/Contrasts alternation along a movie #190931
                            Roger Deakins
                            Keymaster

                              There are films, such as ‘The Assassination of Jesse James…’, on which we created a ‘mood board’ of visual references for every scene, which is something a production designer will almost always do with regard to set design. When it comes to lighting and the choice of color and contrast in camera, I don’t often have specific references in mind but I will, nonetheless, have a pretty clear idea of what I will do on every scene before the first day of shooting. And yes, I am very conscious of the edit and the relationship between each scene and the overall flow of the visuals as the story develops.

                              You ask when the choice of lighting takes place and the answer to that differs from film to film. On ‘BR 2049’ I had lighting concepts and plans drawn out well before shooting began, whereas, on a film like ‘Empire’, there is much more of a day to day approach. That’s because of there is such a difference between a film with complex sets that demands a lot of pre-rigging and lighting and another that is often lit from the truck on the day. And, on a film such as ‘Empire’, most of the lighting balance is made on the day and when looking through the camera. Even when lighting is built into a set the final balance depends on the way the scene evolves and, as in the case of ‘Empire’ can only be done with regard to the daylight conditions.

                              in reply to: Empire of Light – Changeable British Weather! #190926
                              Roger Deakins
                              Keymaster

                                There is little alternative to building some flexibility within a schedule. That said, doing so is difficult given actors availability and the difficulties of gaining permission to shoot in places where there is a lot of public traffic. Our AD, Michael Lerman, managed some skillful shifts of schedule when the weather didn’t look like it was going to cooperate and we also relied a lot on luck. Other than that, it is a case of choosing a time of day for both the scene and/or individual camera angles, to take as much advantage of the light direction as possible. Naturally, that is always a balancing act with the desires of the director and actors but everyone was very understanding of the problem on ‘Empire’.

                                in reply to: NCFOM hotel scene #189959
                                Roger Deakins
                                Keymaster

                                  At that point in the conversation the scene becomes about the two characters and the phone. I think the wide over towards Anton portrays the pressure on Carson.

                                Viewing 15 replies - 181 through 195 (of 316 total)