Roger Deakins

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  • in reply to: Unbroken – Stunning night interior scene #215665
    Roger Deakins
    Keymaster

      I seem to remember that I chose specific practical lights for the scene and mounted inside them some 1K clear bulbs that I had bought for a previous film. That was it. No ring light or any other source. Not that I can remember!

      in reply to: Still Photography Influence #215660
      Roger Deakins
      Keymaster

        I study all kinds of visuals and photography is just one. I think the more you study how others interpret what they see around them, whether through painting, photography or design, the more you will find your own way. Photography, drawing, practice in any visual medium will help you develop.

        in reply to: Exposure #215659
        Roger Deakins
        Keymaster

          In that kind of situation I would judge my exposure from the ambient light, setting my stop where I wanted the daylight to fall. The practical level and any other detail I would judge by eye. But there are many ways to judge exposure and mine is just one. Other cinematographers might use a spot meter, which can produce a quite exact reading if used correctly.

          in reply to: With and without color #215658
          Roger Deakins
          Keymaster

            I love black and white and I shoot all my stills in monochrome. Color can be a distraction – or just eye candy – if it is not well controlled.

            in reply to: The Goldfinch Elevator #215657
            Roger Deakins
            Keymaster

              I believe I had a small ring light above the frame. It was probably skirted to control the walls but its not something I remember well.

              in reply to: Shooting for the Big Screen vs. The small Screen #215645
              Roger Deakins
              Keymaster

                There might be less distinction now that people have such large TV screens. Even then, I think it is still harder to play a scene in a static wide shot for TV. I see few scenes covered in a wide shot when I watch a series but, maybe, that is just because directors and cinematographers have a ‘go to’ setting for TV.

                in reply to: Struggling with perspective in a scene #215644
                Roger Deakins
                Keymaster

                  I like having an overall concept but rules are always there to be broken. If it feels right it may just well be right.

                  in reply to: Directing effect of 1:33 (4:3) ratio #215643
                  Roger Deakins
                  Keymaster

                    Good question!

                    Roger Deakins
                    Keymaster

                      Other than the fall-off of the light, a big source far away is similar to a small source close in. Only one of those references has a bounce source wrapping extra light on the face. And  am not saying which one that was.

                      The blocking of a scene and the choice of the time of day are key. Why is one character backlit and the other in full sun? That is a conscious choice.

                      in reply to: Exposure #215641
                      Roger Deakins
                      Keymaster

                        Shoot it the way you want it to appear on screen.

                        Roger Deakins
                        Keymaster

                          I really agree with those last comments. I don’t consciously think about depth and composition when I am shooting. I too work in an instinctive way and shoot what ‘feels right’. Its the same with technology. If your mind is on the how and the why you are loosing part of your emotional connection to what is in front of you.

                          in reply to: Intentional visual design when composing shots #215607
                          Roger Deakins
                          Keymaster

                            I was hoping someone else would attempt to comment on this post!

                            Yes, a director and cinematographer will usually discuss a general approach to the visualization of a film, and we often do storyboards to illustrate what we intend, but I don’t believe moment to moment decisions are made in such a calculated way. Images are about feelings, as experienced by a cinematographer when composing a shot and, hopefully, in the same way by the audience on viewing it.

                            in reply to: Considerations shooting from a chopper #215603
                            Roger Deakins
                            Keymaster

                              I have always shot from helicopters using bungie cords rather than mounting a head.  You might check your craft but there is usually too much vibration.

                              in reply to: Creating dark shadows on subject #215596
                              Roger Deakins
                              Keymaster

                                Yes, there was a bounce top right. I suspect that had a lamp on it but this was a long time ago! The light hitting April was from the window left of frame and I would have had bounces outside. The window may have carried a light diffusion as well.

                                in reply to: Creating dark shadows on subject #215588
                                Roger Deakins
                                Keymaster

                                  That’s really a matter of focussing your light where you want it! That can be helped by  using solids off frame and draping the walls behind camera with black cloth but you light what you want to see.

                                  The shot could have been made just using natural light through the kitchen window and blocking that which was coming from a screen door to the left of frame. But, although this was shot on location it was dark outside at the time.

                                Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 308 total)