Roger Deakins

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  • in reply to: Final shot of the secret garden? #177417
    Roger Deakins
    Keymaster

      I really can’t remember if the shot was sped up though I doubt it. The shot was made when 1st unit was changing location from London to Yorkshire. The weather was incredibly bad for mid summer so, with only a brief window of time, we were lucky to get that shot.

      in reply to: Cinematography male vs female characters #177199
      Roger Deakins
      Keymaster

        I think it is interesting to study the care that was taken in the past to light an actor when in a close shot. We were recently talking with Billy Williams and had, in anticipation, revisited some of his work: ‘Women in Love’, ‘The Wind and the Lion’ and ‘Gandhi’. Often his close up lighting would vary quite considerably from the wider coverage but this is only apparent if you specifically analyze the lighting. Not so when simply following the story, which certainly benefited from his care. The actors too must have loved what Billy did for them as his close up shots were always beautiful.

        Today there is a tendency to light a set and shoot in the same lighting for a close shot as for a wide. Sometimes a shoot will cover the wide and tight with multiple cameras so there is no chance to make a change if desired. Personally, I will often adjust my lighting as the camera (single camera)  moves in to an actor for a close shot, regardless of that actor’s gender.

        in reply to: A cinematographer without a ‘signature’ #176853
        Roger Deakins
        Keymaster

          Yes, it all depends on what you define as ‘style’. I would not like to be known as a cinematographer who’s style is lighting soft and shooting with a 50mm lens. Whereas, I could light with a single hard source and shoot with an 18mm lens and the image would, I hope, still reflect my taste.

          in reply to: A cinematographer without a ‘signature’ #176848
          Roger Deakins
          Keymaster

            I don’t think I have a particular style at all. As David says, everyone has a personal taste and that informs the work. And, like every cinematographer I know, I have certain tools and techniques I have developed over the years. But technique is only a way to create what is in the mind’s eye and is not , or should not be, the impetus for it.

            While it is true some directors have a defined style I would argue that may are chameleons who morph into each film they take on.

            in reply to: Master anamorphics #176655
            Roger Deakins
            Keymaster

              I am not a fan of anamorphic. I have shot tests in the past but not with the Master anamorphic lenses.

              in reply to: Alexa 35 vs Mini LF #176627
              Roger Deakins
              Keymaster

                That would be a question! Project dependent.

                in reply to: Oil lamps on 1917 #176625
                Roger Deakins
                Keymaster

                  I’m sorry the show was not a success. So it goes!

                  in reply to: Oil lamps on 1917 #176558
                  Roger Deakins
                  Keymaster

                    I guess I am not in your producers good books, though!

                    So what did you do? Tell all.

                    in reply to: Oil lamps on 1917 #176512
                    Roger Deakins
                    Keymaster

                      I usually use 150 or 250 watt bulbs to rig an oil lamp in this way but for ‘1917’ I used 500 watt bulbs of the same kind as are used in conventional Tungsten Fresnel lamps. These were all I could find in the UK, although I have a great range of quartz bulbs in my garage in the US.

                      Once or twice I have used a small strip of blackwrap between the twin bulbs, to hide the one that was away from camera and brighter, but I don’t remember it being necessary to do this on ‘1917’.

                      in reply to: ARRI Sharpness & Detail #176375
                      Roger Deakins
                      Keymaster

                        Interesting. I have not felt that problem with the Alexa.

                        in reply to: ARRI Sharpness & Detail #176362
                        Roger Deakins
                        Keymaster

                          I can’t say I ever change the settings on the Alexa Mini or the LF. Personally, I don’t see why you would. Would it not be better to adjust the image in the DI if you feel the need. You could then adjust sharpness and also add grain.

                          in reply to: ‘In Time’ – Lighting Questions #176332
                          Roger Deakins
                          Keymaster

                            I wish we knew how to retrieve the old forum posts but we don’t.

                            in reply to: LUT Creation to use on set #176204
                            Roger Deakins
                            Keymaster

                              I would be very surprised if the LUT I use is very different from any other. The only adjustment in it is to the contrast curve and the amount of color saturation. That is standard for any LUT that translates the RAW data.

                              in reply to: Best movies to study lighting and cinematography #176194
                              Roger Deakins
                              Keymaster

                                There are two films, ‘In Cold Blood’ and ‘Fat City’, that are indisputably brilliant pieces of film making with cinematography that could not be more perfect. Of course, there are so many films one could mention but these two, so different in style and tone, reflect how ‘right’ cinematography can be. Again, only my opinion and ……

                                in reply to: Best movies to study lighting and cinematography #176157
                                Roger Deakins
                                Keymaster

                                  It is possible to learn something from every film. The more you use your eyes the more you can settle on what you like and how you want to translate an idea into an image. There are some films that I do not think are well shot and I know I am in the minority of opinion on that. But that is my taste. It is not universal and, obviously, not that of the film’s director and cinematographer.

                                  As the saying goes – there is good cinematography and bad cinematography and there is the cinematography that is right for the film.

                                   

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