Roger Deakins

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  • in reply to: Revolutionary Road – Night Interior lighting #215869
    Roger Deakins
    Keymaster

      I remember the 4′ x 4′ bounce muslin was resting on the floor.

      in reply to: Empire of Light – Pan shots to open scenes #215854
      Roger Deakins
      Keymaster

        I seem to remember we used the pan to emphasize the passage of time or simply make a softer cut between scenes. Who’s idea? Probably one each. We discussed the script and our shooting pattern well in advance and these kind of languid pans seemed right for the piece. Of course, most were lost in the cut.

        in reply to: Revolutionary Road – Night Interior lighting #215853
        Roger Deakins
        Keymaster

          Yes, that was a long time ago. I laugh at this scene because we had tented the whole house, so that I had room for lamps outside, but by the time we came to shoot it was dark outside.

          The bounce source was an unbleached muslin and I suspect the lamps was attached to the ceiling. Otherwise, as you say, the light would have been too close. The hard light was supposed to mimic a street lamp. Just a 650 with a half blue gel on it.

          The rain? Yes, the  rain felt like it mirrored the sadness of the scene. ‘In Cold Blood’ did it so much better.

          in reply to: Old Flash Photography Effect #215852
          Roger Deakins
          Keymaster

            You can’t beat using the real thing. A small lightning strikes unit might do the job.

            in reply to: B&W Photography #215788
            Roger Deakins
            Keymaster

              I do prefer my still photos in B&W. Sometimes I use a color camera and sometimes a monochrome camera. I wouldn’t say I am looking at the light differently either way. Something just seems worthy of a photograph or it doesn’t.

              So many great photographers. Some seem more interested in the light and composition than making a comment on society, others are all about the subject. Bill Brandt took images that varied wildly from one to another.

              The photographers that inspire me are usually those that reveal something of themselves. You see their personality in their images.

              in reply to: Lighting for mood and evoking an emotion. #215785
              Roger Deakins
              Keymaster

                I think you have to get in touch with your own emotions. Get a lamp and play with light, or go out and take some stills. What affects you?

                in reply to: Cinematography advice #215784
                Roger Deakins
                Keymaster

                  1. The script and the director’s thoughts regarding the script. From that I use my imagination. It’s imagination, exploration and collaboration. After that come all the practical issues you have to take into account when you point a camera.

                  2. The lens informs the audience where they are in relationship to the subject. I don’t know how the choice of the lens could be considered unimportant! Just take a photograph of a face on a variety of lenses! It should be clear why its important.

                  3.  I’m inspired by everything I experience. What helps? More experiencing!

                  in reply to: Continuity with Haze #215783
                  Roger Deakins
                  Keymaster

                    I have worked with effects teams that use a densitometer. That is really accurate but I would still adjust the level by eye. The issue being smoke in a backlight looks heavier than in a side light!

                    in reply to: jean pierre melville #215765
                    Roger Deakins
                    Keymaster

                      All of them! Le Samurai, Circle Rouge, Army of Shadows. Duxieme Souffle is probably the best heist movie ever made. Army of Shadows the most realistic film about the French resistance. You could start with The Silence of the Ocean. B&W. Basically shot in one room with three characters. I think it was Melville’s first film. A Masterpiece.

                      in reply to: Animation films composition and lighting. #215764
                      Roger Deakins
                      Keymaster

                        We always referred to lens lengths and precise compositions on the animated film we were involved with. But, as always, its a collaboration with a great many people.

                        Camera capture was only used on specific scenes or, as with Rango, to explore a set. For the Croods, we were looking at how a hand held camera would feel. I’ve only experienced it in limited situations rather than an entire film.

                        in reply to: Oldschool Hollywood lighting 50s/60s #215763
                        Roger Deakins
                        Keymaster

                          The film is definitely stunning! I’m certainly not denying that. Technology and tastes change, which is a pity because there is a place from different ‘looks’, On Lawrence, it was the style to see into the shadows.

                          Roger Deakins
                          Keymaster

                            YouTube video? That may be from a test, I haven’t seen it. The lamps are spaced so that any multiple shadow is inconsequential. If you were to look at the lighting on a white sheet of paper, you would definitely see a shadow for every single lamp. If I was lighting a white sheet of paper I would use diffusion or have the lamps even closer together. On a face the shadows don’t register and if there is movement….

                            I use fresnel lamps, as on Lebowski, O Brother, Jarhead, or True Grit, so the light is confined to a single area but still appears as one soft source in that area. On True Grit, for the night scenes, the lamps were 5 – 7 feet apart, but looking from 1,000 feet, that’s not a great distance. If I had done the same on BR2049, at 20 feet it would have looked ridiculous.

                            Roger Deakins
                            Keymaster

                              I don’t know if Surefire still exist. They were my go to but they were not LED.

                              in reply to: Oldschool Hollywood lighting 50s/60s #215756
                              Roger Deakins
                              Keymaster

                                You ask if its possible on digital and you show an AI reference that shows it is possible!  Filmmakers and cinematographers are dealing with the technology of their time. Lawrence of Arabia looks a little rigid and over lit today  but at the time it was state of the art. Could you reproduce the same look today? Sure. Would you want to?

                                in reply to: Animation films composition and lighting. #215718
                                Roger Deakins
                                Keymaster

                                  The process varied a little from film to film. We did storyboard most films we were involved with, I say we but tehre is a whole team doing story reels as they call them. We just gave advice, swapped ideas. For ‘How to Train your Dragon’ and ‘Croods’ we did some camera capture. This is where you have a virtual copy of your set and the characters within it and you can move around them, alter the sync etc.. But, mostly, shots were constructed by a very large team of people working over a long period of time, working with teh story reel as a basis.

                                  Frustrating for us was that the lighting team then did their work and there was not enough interchange between the layout and lighting.

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