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  • in reply to: Is the craft of lighting black and white different from color? #214906
    Stip
    Participant

      Sorry, I take back the B&W viewing finder recommendation, just tested my old one, it’s not working well enough on reds and yellows.

      in reply to: Is the craft of lighting black and white different from color? #214905
      Stip
      Participant

        I have to add, the viewing filter is still quite far from true B&W, it’s more like looking through a dense ND, but it could help someone not familiar with B&W get a feeling for what basically happens with colors in B&W.

        in reply to: Is the craft of lighting black and white different from color? #214904
        Stip
        Participant

          You might consider a B&W viewing filter to help judge contrast by eye (e.g. Tiffen T1 Black & White Viewing Filter). It’s also nice to just carry with you and look at things through it and get a feel for how colors work in B&W.

          You might also consider color filters for the lens (red, green, yellow) to alter varying degrees of contrast, although some prior experience might be needed when using these.

          in reply to: The limits of only using practicals? #214859
          Stip
          Participant

            I think it looks great and has the mood you were aiming for. In my opinion one can get fantastic, and maybe even more authentic, results for night interiors (or exteriors close to a house) with clever use of practicals and no film lights.

            in reply to: Thoughts on books by Blain Brown #214848
            Stip
            Participant

              I would guess the students you refer to still read a lot, though. The internet is one huge book. I used to collect hundreds of articles from dedicated filmmaking or cinematography sites whenever they contained something I found useful or inspiring.

              Books have some advantages over the more fractured knowledge of the internet though.

              in reply to: Thoughts on books by Blain Brown #214834
              Stip
              Participant

                I can’t say anything about Blain Brown, just that books about cinematography (or filmmaking in general) never worked for me personally. They could be inspiring and great theory, but very seldom anything actually translated onto set later.

                I think I learned more by listening to Team Deakins than from any book, e.g. it made me realize how differently people can go about the same task. Which made me more confident in my own choices or actions when they didn’t correspond to what I believed to be conventional.

                This is not to discourage you from getting books, people are different and what didn’t work for me might work very well for you!

                in reply to: Greig Fraser – THE BATMAN Part 1 – Aug 16, 2023 #214827
                Stip
                Participant

                  I know Roger and James like the cinematography of ‘The Batman’ but to me it left a strange taste when I left the cinema. It was visually stunning but also felt off and artificial. Later I learned that much was shot in The Volume, which explained the fake, video game-ish feeling it gave me. Combined with the many plot holes everyone was seemingly happy to ignore, it left me with a shallow impression.

                  But that’s just me and my growing dislike for anything fake in this growingly fake world; The cinematography is excellent and the vast majority likes it very much.

                  in reply to: Ruth De Jong – Aug 9, 2023 #214821
                  Stip
                  Participant

                    Hi Abraham,

                    before listening to it, are there any spoilers for Oppenheimer in this episode?

                    in reply to: Advice on film set etiquette #214820
                    Stip
                    Participant

                      Yea but stop asking questions should the going get tough, haha. You’ll learn so much just by being there and observing.

                      Usually, film crew are really cool people, so don’t worry too much. I only met a few bad lemons in 20 years.

                      One thing that you should avoid though is to make suggestions on something if you haven’t been asked, e.g. if the director and set designer discuss the color of the curtains, they’d probably not appreciate if you’d join their discussion 🙂

                      in reply to: Natural & available light #214803
                      Stip
                      Participant

                        Also check locations how they look/feel during different times of day and schedule accordingly.

                        in reply to: James scares me when she talks about sloppy exposure #214802
                        Stip
                        Participant

                          A tip would be to shoot and then edit it yourself.

                          One thing you’ll learn about for example is (in-) consistency between shots of a scene. How much of it is still fine for post (minor exposure shifts to glue a scene together are common), how much is too much and where the devil is hidden (e.g. color temperature or tint changes).

                          It’s a good idea to always try to get it as close as possible in-camera, but it’s hard to do perfectly and there is a certain wiggle room, and to know that wiggle room can give you more confidence on set.

                          in reply to: Natural & available light #214801
                          Stip
                          Participant

                            I meant to say lighting takes place during pre-production and production as in, you can already scout locations for favorable practicals, windows ect. You can also block towards natural light and/or rearrange practicals accordingly. I highly recommend hiring a set designer / art director even if you only have a micro budget (at these budgets crew members usually wear several hats).

                            in reply to: Natural & available light #214800
                            Stip
                            Participant

                              You may also want to look into the later films of Jean-Marc Vallée. On ‘Dallas Buyer’s Club’ he started to shoot with available light only, as he wanted to be able to shoot 360° on set. Afterwards he fell in love with this style of shooting ( how fast he could get things done and how freeing it was for his collaboration with the actors) and other movies followed. “Demolition” is another very nice example.

                              I’m a huge fan of available light and it works great on drama, where authenticity is often more important than a nice looking image, but can also work for other genres. “Children of Men” used available light to a large portion (or all?), also Emmanuel Lubezki’s work on “Birdman” or “The Revenant” (only the camp fire scene is lit).

                              Keep in mind though that on these set’s, the lighting basically takes place in pre-production and is within the set design. If you’re going to shoot on a micro budget, you may want to spend some time on changing/relocationg/adding practicals to your locations wherever you can.

                              in reply to: Are Cinematographers only “executors” #214791
                              Stip
                              Participant

                                Ultimately the director has the last say so what you describe is possible and ‘technically’ ok. Of course it’s not fulfilling as you’re more of a camera operator. So other factors decide whether to take the job (pay, gather experience, make connections ect). But even a job like this should present situations where you can bring yourself in.

                                in reply to: What’s the deal with 50mm? #214769
                                Stip
                                Participant

                                  It seems like 50mm was – and still is – the easiest (and cheapest) to design and build to achieve good image quality at fast apertures.

                                  The ‘Double Gauss’ design was invented in 1817 by Carl Friedrich Gauss as a telescope lens and later refined by many others like Taylor Hobson in the 1920’s (later resulting in the Speed Panchros). The current design, presently found in inexpensive but high quality fast lenses like Canon EF 50mm 1.8 or Nikon AD 50mm 1.8, can be traced back to 1895 to Paul Rudolph and Carl Zeiss (the first Zeiss Planar lens).

                                  From Wikipedia:

                                  “The design forms the basis for many camera lenses in use today, especially the wide-aperture standard lenses used on 35 mm and other small-format cameras. It can offer good results up to f/1.4 with a wide field of view, and has sometimes been made at f/1.0. The design appears in other applications where a simple fast normal lens is required (~53° diagonal) such as in projectors.”

                                   

                                  So the projection thing would make sense not just for the viewer experience but also on a technical level!

                                Viewing 15 replies - 76 through 90 (of 186 total)