Stip

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  • in reply to: Merry Christmas #215401
    Stip
    Participant

      Merry Christmas!

      in reply to: Shallow depth of field #215390
      Stip
      Participant

        But weren’t those still s35 sensors? The past few years there emerged lots of full frame / 135 sensor cameras (and more fast lens options too). I definitely noticed a trend in very shallow DoF, especially in TV shows, where you’d sometimes even see wide shots with fore-/background separation.

        No single technique is better or worse than another, it all depends on whether it is wielded by an artist or not — and Greig Fraser is an artist, he’s proven that on many productions.

        Fraser is an artist but I don’t have to admire all of his work, and this one is too computational for me. The new tool of gaming engines being used to create worlds around the stage bares the danger of feeling like a computer game and it happened to me in The Batman too often, although I wasn’t aware of how it was shot when watching.

        I also had the feeling the visuals tried to deflect me from an ultimately shallow story and endless plot holes 🙂

        in reply to: Shallow depth of field #215385
        Stip
        Participant

          That scene from The Batman threw me out of the movie (and into a computer game) the most from the many scenes that were filmed in The Volume. Visually stunning but just didn’t work for me, felt too perfectly computational, too often.

          The best (worst) example for shallow DoF galore I can think of is Zack Snyder’s Netflix film “Army of the Dead”, where he paired the large sensor of a RED Monstro with vintage Canon 50mm f0.95 and 35mm f1.5 lenses and shot everything wide open.

          The film is as shallow as the DoF he filmed it in. I had to fast forward after 30 minutes and eventually stop. Even though making ok use of it, I think it is still exemplary for random use of very shallow DoF in modern productions.

          in reply to: In camera lens corrections #215378
          Stip
          Participant

            I would say this is changing drastically though. We are seeing new, affordable lenses enter the market every year from mostly Chinese manufacturers, and these lenses get better and better every year, too. Spherical or anamorphic, photography or videography/cinema lenses. They started with terrible quality a few years back but have improved vastly at a high pace – similar to what we see in LED film lighting.

            E.g. today you can get decent performing anamorphic lenses for 10 times less than equivalent lenses cost just 5-10 years ago, with quality differences being diminished with every iteration.

            I would expect lenses in general to become noticeably more affordable in the future. I know lenses are a hot (often emotionally and sometimes even esoterically loaded) topic and many cinematographers disagree 🙂

            in reply to: Working with Different Directors #215371
            Stip
            Participant

              You may check their YouTube channel, they talked about it frequently.

              in reply to: Prisoners: What’s with the tree? #215366
              Stip
              Participant

                Congratulations Roger, that shot is entering the territory of Ozu’s famous vase shot in ‘Late Spring’, which people try to understand until today, haha.

                 

                in reply to: Zoom in vs dolly pushing #215365
                Stip
                Participant

                  They did, thanks!

                  in reply to: Zoom in vs dolly pushing #215358
                  Stip
                  Participant

                    Just curious, when was the last time you used a zoom-in?

                    in reply to: In camera lens corrections #215351
                    Stip
                    Participant

                      Take this with a grain of salt, as I never looked into it deeper, but as far as I know a camera needs the exact distortion data from a lens to perform it correctly. If a lens is not supported, correction will yield false results. Panasonic’s cheaper photography lenses for instance are much worse when not corrected in camera, usually by a Panasonic camera.

                      in reply to: Zoom in vs dolly pushing #215342
                      Stip
                      Participant

                        Our mind can zoom in but I still disagree that a lens zoom is ‘natural’ because that visual process does not happen in real life when our mind zooms in; the lens zoom is a creative effect to represent that process (one that can work very well). It comes down to how one defines ‘natural’. And more important, in the end it doesn’t matter if it serves the story and the audience isn’t pulled out of it.

                        Personally, I found zooms pull me out of the story much easier than dolly moves but they both have their place, and there they work.

                        in reply to: Zoom in vs dolly pushing #215337
                        Stip
                        Participant

                          That’s true but I’m not sure if that scenario qualifies for a zoom vs dolly push-in comparison 🙂

                          in reply to: Zoom in vs dolly pushing #215334
                          Stip
                          Participant

                            I think zooms feel less natural because our eyes can’t zoom. We need to move physically closer towards objects for them to become larger, which is what the push in does.

                            in reply to: Considerations when lighting daytime exteriors #215305
                            Stip
                            Participant

                              The sun moves fast!

                              On the last image the actors are in the shade while unimportant objects in the back- and foreground are prominent from being in direct sun. Judging from the second frame grab, that happened because the sun had already moved away from where the action took place (unless this was intended for specific reasons).

                              Scheduling, blocking and time management already solve many issues and prevent others from happening.

                              in reply to: Lighting for dark sequences #215284
                              Stip
                              Participant

                                Personally if I want it really dark but rather clean I go down to ISO 200, especially when shooting with cameras that have unaesthetic noise, to have some room to crush it in post.

                                in reply to: Tips for steady handheld shots #215254
                                Stip
                                Participant

                                  Whether you put the tripod over your shoulder or hold it in front of you like a stabilizer, find the center of gravity. You can do this by balancing the whole thing on the side of your hand. Once you found it, hold it there (if using like a stabilizer) or have that be the point resting on your shoulder. You may need to attach counter weights depending on the weight of your camera setup.

                                Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 162 total)