Max A.

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  • in reply to: Happy Birthday, Roger! #215888
    Max A.
    Participant

      Happy Birthday Mr. Deakins! I wish you all the best this world can give you! ❤
      Your talent and wisdom are pure gold for us.
      Thank you for your infinite patience in answering my long questions 😁.

      I wish you a wonderful day.
      Max.

      in reply to: Empire of Light – Pan shots to open scenes #215861
      Max A.
      Participant

        Thank you very much for your answer Mr. Deakins! I loved the peace of the whole film, so I enjoyed this kind of pan shots very much. ❤

        I wish you a peaceful day.

        Max.

        in reply to: Revolutionary Road – Night Interior lighting #215860
        Max A.
        Participant

          Thank you so much for your reply Mr. Deakins! The anecdote related to the preparation of the scene is funny.
          My impostor syndrome would have made me feel guilty, for some reason, about what happened regarding the production even if so many things happen during the day on a set.

          If I can ask another question about the scene, do you remember if the bounce sources were positioned next to the bed? Because I don’t see the fall-off of the light on the bed sheet. So It seems that maybe the bounce sources are on the floor next to the bed so they don’t directly affect the bed. (with lamps on the ceiling) creating an unpleasant and unnatural effect.

          The effect of the rain is the icing on the cake of this scene as usual perfectly balanced in lighting and composition!

          Thank you again for your reply and your time Mr. Deakins, reading from you it is priceless for me.
          I wish you a peaceful day.
          Max.

          in reply to: The “Look” of ‘Hail Cesar’ #215727
          Max A.
          Participant

            Hello Stip, thank you very much for your suggestion! Yes, I use Davinci Resolve, I tend to try to do the same process you mention with tools in Resolve but good to know that there is another tool to try! I love to tweak color densities in Resolve, but of course, a skilled color scientist can use specific tools over others (also in Resolve) to achieve more “scientific” results, but this is another topic to talk about 😄.
            Everything is interesting and comparison is something I love, but I haven’t always been able to find “colleagues” willing to discuss.

            I wish you a nice day.
            Max.

            in reply to: The “Look” of ‘Hail Cesar’ #215724
            Max A.
            Participant

              Thank you very much for your reply Mr. Deakins! I apologize if something is altered in the image of the film. I took the picture from Filgrab, a website with many movie stills, maybe there was a loss of color details (probably based on the Internet color space) when the website uploaded the stills. Maybe, they took the stills from a movie source with colors slightly off, who knows?

              When you say that you did shoot the exteriors to be warm, and based on the fact that you shoot with film stock did you warm the image during DI or by adding a filter in front of the lens (or maybe shooting with a daylight stock with 85filter but I know you prefer the tungsten stock when you shot in film).
              Maybe today a solution could be shooting with a white balance slightly off (as suggested by Stip), my curiosity is related to the process with the film stock workflow.

              I also love the color density that film stock has, it is not easy to “replicate” with digital files until I don’t work with a high-end camera and expert colorist.

              As always, thank you for your patience in answering our questions, it is priceless for me.
              I apologize for my bad English.

              I wish you a peaceful day.
              Max.

              in reply to: Lighting Notes #215703
              Max A.
              Participant

                Thank you very much for this AksyayYd! I also have a little collection of saved pages from the old forum but unfortunately, all the pages I did put into the bookmarks of the browser are lost and only some of those are saved in PDF (I paid dearly for my laziness).
                Those notes, also if without a certain context are precious, a lot of those I remember the posts where comes from!
                Thank you for your sharing!

                Max.

                in reply to: Dealing with direct sunlight in Sicario? #215701
                Max A.
                Participant

                  This scene was discussed a lot in the old forum that unfortunately was lost. If I remember correctly, Mr. Deakins purposely wanted the harshest of direct sunlight so no diffusion was used for the scene, also I seem to remember that other than bounce light to “fill” shadows, sometimes Mr. Deakins used black clothes and negative fill to reduce the “hot-fill” coming from the light and bright floor.
                  But, of course, Mr. Deakins can be more precise and talk about his process for that scene, mine is only a memory I have of that scene from the old forum.

                  I wish you a nice day,
                  Max.

                  in reply to: Unbroken – Stunning night interior scene #215687
                  Max A.
                  Participant

                    in reply to: Unbroken – Stunning night interior scene #215680
                    Max A.
                    Participant


                      in reply to: Unbroken – Stunning night interior scene #215677
                      Max A.
                      Participant

                        Thank you very much for your reply Mr. Deakins! The shot (as for the entire movie) is fantastic!
                        It seems to me (and maybe it is something that I would do in this case) that the two practicals at the center are the “strongest” ones and make possible the pool of light, the one on the left frame in the background seems to me less bright that the one in the center. Do you remember if you put the 1k clear bulbs in the center practicals? I also love the color quality of the tungsten source, do you remember if, during the DI process, you reduced the red channel?

                        And If I can ask another question, for the other shots of the scene (I attach frames below) do you still use only the practical lights (maybe dimming or turning off some to create shadows area), or did you “argument” those practical lights with external sources (maybe the overhead close-up have some “special” lighting)?

                        Thank you again for your reply Mr. Deakins and I apologize for my bad English.

                        I wish you a peaceful day.
                        Max.

                        Max A.
                        Participant

                          I’m sorry for the delayed answer. Thank you very much for your reply Mr.Deakins.

                          If I have to guess which shot has a bounce source maybe I would say the one of “True Grit”, but the fact that to me it is not so evident is proof of the natural result of the other shots that I uploaded as reference.

                          Thank you for your lesson about the blocking and the “right” time of the day to have the “right” light, I also think it is the first aspect to consider during scouting, the second step is to talk to the director and “suggest” the right blocking for the light.

                          If I can extend this topic, I would like to ask you, if it is possible, your narrative point of view about the choice to have one character backlight or full sun or backlight, etc.
                          Of course, there is not a single formula or a single “convention” and more often (as was for me also if I have shot only two low-budget features) the story suggests inspirations, but do you always think about the narrative point that you want to achieve when choosing to have a character in a position related to the sun or sometimes (maybe if that point of the story doesn’t seem to request a “precise dramatic light”) you think about your subject and background to have a shot with a “nice light”?

                          For instance, (and this is only an instance) why do you choose to have the character in a 3/4 backlight in the last still of NCFOM?

                          As always I want to thank you for your time and patience, it is priceless.
                          I apologize for my bad English.

                          I wish you a peaceful Sunday,
                          Max.

                          in reply to: Godland (2022) #215622
                          Max A.
                          Participant

                            Hello Francesanna, If I can join in this conversation, I saw the film yesterday after reading your topic. In my opinion, the movie is really great. The slow pace gives the whole movie a narrative depth (always in my opinion). Some camera movements are really intense, especially for the long pans or tracking shots.
                            The locations are insane and while I saw it sometimes I thought about the difficulties they faced in making those shots. I’m not a purist or film critic, I simply react to what I see, and looking at everything that is produced today for platforms and for high consumption, I find that it is quite rare to find producers intent on producing a similar film, it was absolutely worth it.

                            About cinematography, always in my opinion and to talk together about the movie, actually I’m not a huge fan of 4:3 aspect ratio, because I think that is a sort of “trend” that cinematographers want to follow (I really don’t love trends) but, in this movie is part of the story and to me enrich the narrative of the movie. I think that if the film had been shot in 1:85 or 2:35 it would have lost a crucial feature of the storytelling, so in this case, the aspect ratio (in my opinion) is really at the service of the story and enhances the narrative.
                            The compositions are really awesome. The movie has a photographic world in which it always remains faithful without betraying it, and this for me is the highest value. There is (in my opinion) always the cinematographer’s research to have the right light and not the “beautiful” one. It’s a very subtle step to think of a shot to make it aesthetically “beautiful”, then losing what should be the photographic essence of the film. I think Maria Von Hausswolff really nailed it!
                            Some interiors remind me of some paintings by Carl Holsøe. I loved also the color palettes of the scenes as well as the stunning weather conditions of the exteriors.

                            So this is just my opinion, thank you for suggesting this movie, I really enjoyed it!

                            I apologize for my English.
                            Have a nice day,

                            Max.

                            in reply to: Creating dark shadows on subject #215598
                            Max A.
                            Participant

                              Thank you so much for your reply Mr. Deakins! It’s always fantastic to read from you.

                              Max.

                              in reply to: Creating dark shadows on subject #215595
                              Max A.
                              Participant

                                Hello Mr. Deakins, I hope you and Mrs. James are well. If I can ask a question in this topic opened by Joshua, can I ask you how you achieved the light on the faces of the talents?

                                On ‘Frank’ there seems to be a bounce right frame, if so, the bounce did catch only the light coming from the glass on the door or did you put a lamp to bounce from inside?

                                For ‘April’, the light that reaches her face, was it coming from outside the glass of the door? If it is so, did you put direct lamps through diffusions or did you bounce also outside?

                                As always, Thank you for your availability and your patience.
                                I wish you a peaceful day.
                                Max.

                                in reply to: About low key lighting #215563
                                Max A.
                                Participant

                                  Hello Stip!

                                  I’m sorry for the delayed answer. Now I understand your process, it is interesting and I never thought about it in that way. Usually I “pick” an ISO level that “looks fine” to me for the project and stick with it (of course depends on the different situations and how I can control the light).
                                  I will try your method and shoot some tests with my BMPCC6K which I usually use for low-mid projects.

                                  To answer also to Jakob, I like the result of your framing. It is dark but I like the tone. It has some grain but I think it is acceptable.

                                  What I understand is that low-key scenes (especially for not high-end cameras) are often tricky, what I often noticed is that a lot of cameras struggle in the underexposure areas (like when there is -2 to -3 STOPS in the reflected light) but in areas falling in the black looks clear.
                                  As Stips says probably cameras like Alexa don’t have this problem, I never shot on Alexa so I can’t say but if I also want to refer to Mr. Deakins movies there are a lot of scenes in Skyfall, Sicario, Prisoners, 1917, The Goldfinch and Empire of Light (to mention some) with low-key scenarios and those have zero noise and stunning details! The unparalleled talent that has Mr.Deakins is the principal aspect of those results but I think also a great camera can help a cinematographer to “take his risks” and underexpose areas with an “extra pinch of serenity”.

                                  I apologize for my bad English and I wish you all a nice weekend.
                                  Max.

                                Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 78 total)