Website Chatter

Back to Website Chatter...

Podcast Topic (15 replies and 2 comments)

simon m
1 year ago
simon m 1 year ago

Hello James and Roger. I'd love to hear Roger talk about his process of developing a 'shot list' from a script. I realize this would most likely be done with the director, so that would be interesting also. How far into the story and character does Roger go for coming up with certain shots? How does the mood of a certain scene affect his choice of camera placement? Does he have an over-arching philosophy regarding camera placement/movement?

I could keep going, but you get the idea. Hope you can use this in your podcasts. All the best.

David W
1 year ago
David W 1 year ago

Perhaps some insight on the process of choosing the composition when the story isnt storyboarded, how much does the director have the final call? 

Vanniyan
1 year ago
Vanniyan 1 year ago

Hello James i love to hear roger shot constructions for different genre. Because shot construction vary depends the script. May be lens choice also. How much lensing affect the story.? 

gavinvmurrray
1 year ago
gavinvmurrray 1 year ago

Working with AD's, Directors, and PD's in prep, getting on the same page and sharing vision, is a topic I'd love to hear more about. Also thoughts as to communicating with keys during prep, ie. if you talk budget with them, or if that's more of a conversation between the line producer and your keys. 

socearrullain
1 year ago
socearrullain 1 year ago

I read today that Roger said he wasn't a massive fan of Shawshank until a few years ago, and that actually made me both sad and reflective.

 

I love that movie, the story is perfect for film, the cinematography is just incredible and the pacing of the edit is perfect.

 

This is perhaps my all time fav movie. So I wonder what it was that made Roger dislike, or perhaps not be as happy with his work on this production until relatively recently?

In My extremely humble opinion, Shawshank is perhaps the best made movie of the 90s, hands down. 

It certainly inspired me, that is for sure. But I understand that things might not have gone as desired or been as smooth as one hoped on a project. Very keen to hear directly from Roger himself about the whole story in his own words. 

 

Roger Deakins
1 year ago
Roger Deakins 1 year ago

A note on 'Shawshank'. I did not mean to imply that I didn't like the film so much as I didn't know what I felt. When you finish a shoot it is hard to have a true perspective on the final product. You are too close to the experience and, especially if it was a hard shoot, it takes time before you can watch the film and be objective. I am rarely satisfied with any film I have worked on until some time has passes. And that usually means years.

I loved 'Mountains of the Moon' from the day we finished shooting. I always felt that was a special film. It's a pity audiences didn't feel the same way but, perhaps, that was because they didn't have the experience of making it. It's hard to be objective, even now!

Krishan
1 year ago
Krishan 1 year ago

I think that's a great source of topics for the podcast, though. Not to get too metaphorical, but it's a lot like your optical viewfinder in that we, the audience, only get to see the half of the story that isn't reflected into your eyepiece: We can rewatch your movies countless times and generate our own opinions of the finished product, but it's so interesting to hear your unique perspective of the on-set experience 🙂

socearrullain
1 year ago
socearrullain 1 year ago

completely understand the whole aspect of looking back on work years later when you feel you can disconnect from it a little more. As creatives I think we are drawn to learning from our challenges and it takes time to let go of certain things to be able to enjoy a piece of work for what it truly is. 

For me, Shawshank represented how a story 'should' be told in terms of the pacing of the edit, the colour scheme matching the timeline, the attitudes of the cast, the presence of the cast and eye-trace in terms of drawing the audience in. Of course, back then I hadn't really thought about those things, it was years later I realised what a masterpiece it is and why I am so in love with that movie. It never ceases to make me emotional  -on every level - no matter how many times I watch it. Simply loved every aspect of it and at no point was I wondering what was going to happen next, nor was I disconnected from the screen, I was right there in the story, and it blew me away visually and audibly. It also inspired me to stay interested in photography and film making, so I guess I would like to just say thank you for the work, care and time you gave to it, both you and James. My copy goes on at least once a year, it only tops "Chariots of Fire" in terms of emotional connection and entertainment for me. 

Grateful for having seen and experienced "Shawshank Redemption"! 

David W
1 year ago
David W 1 year ago

Maybe some insight on how Roger and the director develops the camera movement for the story in preproduction and how that changes in the field? 

How his camera movement has changed over time with newer technology, or the lack thereof?

Beck Starr
1 year ago

Hi. Thanks for this awesome forum. I'd also like to hear about how the camera movement and technical choices between the director and cinematographer are developed in preproduction.

James
1 year ago
James 1 year ago

Thank you all for suggesting topics! Keep them coming!

James

Yannick
1 year ago

Hey Roger & James,
 
Great to hear that you will be doing some podcasts in the near future. I'm excited for this!
 
I'd love to hear about some of the following topics.
* The interview process before you get confirmed onto a project. How does it work and how long does that process take? Is it all down to the director?
* The way you work and collaborate together?
* How you work with your gaffer and how far into pre-production do they usually start to work on the project?
* Lighting plans
* How you work together in prep and on the shooting days with all the various departments such as art, production etc.
* Shooting schedules!
* What are the most important things to remember if you’re on a low budget production?
* How are things different between a $40 million film and a $250 million dollar film?
* Cut points in 1917 - how many were there etc?

I’ll try and think of some more things too.

Many thanks!

simon m
1 year ago
simon m 1 year ago

I'd also love to hear how Roger works with the set dresser. I keep noticing how the set is really another character in a scene, and if done well gives context and tactile-ness to it. So would love to hear how Roger works with the dresser, how much input, or perhaps that falls more on another department?

Back to Website Chatter...