Team Deakins Podcast

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Episode 2 - Working together (4 replies)

James
1 year ago
James 1 year ago

Episode 2 examines how Roger & James work together. We work as team throughout the entire process - which probably makes us a pretty boring couple.

You can find the podcast here.»

Please post comments or questions below.

Keith Putnam
1 year ago
Keith Putnam 1 year ago

Sorry to repeat what I posted under the episode on the podcast page, but it seems like it's more appropriate to post here rather than there.

Fascinating to hear about the dead photosites you found on the Alexa in individual color channels, as the same thing happened to me. VFX kicked back some greenscreen shots because they found the same problem.
I loaded the footage into Resolve and applied a channel separation, and there it was, totally obvious. Not sure ARRI has every really addressed this issue.

But, like you say, it’s not possible to see under normal circumstances.

Surui
1 year ago
Surui 1 year ago

Hi! I'm a recently graduated film student who still has a lot to learn. When I was listening to this episode of the podcast, you guys mentioned a lot about "timing" and "baked in timing" for visual effects in post-production, and how some post-processes were affect by it. However, the film school didn't teach us anything about this process. Could you elaborate on this subject? What is "timing" and what does it do? Thanks!

James
1 year ago
James 1 year ago

Hi Surui,

"Timing" is also called grading. It's the process at the end of the film where you balance the transitions from shot to shot. If you are viewing a shot that skews blue, when you come to the next shot, because of the afterimage effect, it can look a bit yellow. If that second shot were on it's own or following a different shot, this wouldn't happen. So once the film is cut and you know the order of the shots, you go through them and balance them so the shots look the way you intended and there are no abrupt shifts. Also, if there are density differences within the various shots of a scene, you can balance these as well.

In a film lab, the timer would put the negative on a machine called the hazeltine and determine the various amounts of Red Green and Blue light the printer should use shot by shot. There were three lights that passed through the negative onto the print stock and the timing values determined the amount each light was opened. But that also meant you couldn't make a very big change from, for instance, very little blue to fully open blue because there would be some frames where the light was still coming open to full.

Nowadays, the material is brought into the "DI" Suite - DI meaning Digital Intermediate. We time the material by sitting by a timer (who knows how to run the software) and looking at the film projected. If blue needs to be taken out, the timer can do that in real time and you can check that the effect is what you wanted.

I hope this made sense!

James

Untitledkingdom
6 months ago
Untitledkingdom 6 months ago

Hi Team Deakins,

What a great episode. I work in the post side of things so its interesting to hear about the workflows on the production side. And yes, always providing the file back the way it came in only adding the vfx or paint changes (keeping the original grain intact). That's something that's always drilled into us in post... 😉

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