Lighting

True Grit - LaBoeuf opening sequence (5 replies and 4 comments)

Zac
5 months ago
Zac 5 months ago

Hey Roger,

Just watched True Grit again recently and was once again really inspired.  I had a question regarding the sequence of shots when we first see Laboeuf.

I loved the blue look to the sequence and especially when he lit the pipe.

So my question is was the blue look achieved naturally by shooting at 'blue hour' or was it achieved with additional lighting? And then, was when LaBoeuf strikes the match just lit from the match itself? Because it registers pretty bright in the shot. I haven't been able to achieve that sort of exposure when I tried something similar.

Any answer from Roger or anyone else on the forum would be really appreciated.

I searched the forum for an answer on this but couldn't find it, if its already been covered would someone be able to link me to the topic so it doesn't need to be answered again?

Thanks,

Zac

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/1312.jpg
Roger Deakins
5 months ago
Roger Deakins 5 months ago

We shot that scene at dusk with tungsten balanced stock and no correction. The match was a specially chosen make with a large strike. Ther was no additional lighting.

Zac
5 months ago

Thanks for the quick response. Yeah the flame looked pretty big.

Mike
5 months ago
Mike 5 months ago

Ditto !  I asked Roger that same question months ago and was surprised it was just the one match albeit a large one!  I thought he used a specially made match but he said that they are standard and readily available in the US. We had them in the UK once but cannot get them anymore. They are much brighter than the standard match and presume they were that size in the 1880's before they introduced the smaller type.

lovely shot wasn't it.  

Zac
5 months ago

Do you know what they are called? It would be great to try them out!

Mike
5 months ago
Mike 5 months ago

Bryant and May  apparently still make them in the UK and also sold in the US under different brands. Just search for extra long matches.

But in the 1880's they were hand dipped into phoserous mix and so some matches burned brighter than others. I will be inclined to glue 3 heads together on one match to make it extra bright.

In Rogers 'True Grit' it appears to have a really long flame. Perhaps the US made ones have a larger head. I am still amazed at the brightness of the match in this scene and wondered if he had a Cree light bulb buried in his hand but apparently not.

Roger Deakins
5 months ago
Roger Deakins 5 months ago

It could well have been two matches held together. It was a while ago so don't expect me to remember exactly!

Zac
5 months ago

Thanks for the reply, was such a great shot!

Mike
5 months ago
Mike 5 months ago

yes, it was a great shot. It doesn't matter how many matches Roger used, he got the shot he was after. After a test with one match, the replay showed the results. Then move up to 2 matches, 3, 4 ! Then perhaps a stick of dynamite!

It was the length of the flame that got me. Even Dicaprio looked surprise. That makes it even better.

Mike
5 months ago

Should have read Matt Damon NOT decaprio. I always get those two mixed up. Sorry about that

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