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Skyfall Bulbs (4 replies and 5 comments)

JeeBoo
1 month ago
JeeBoo 1 month ago

Dear Roger, 

Do you recall what kind of bulbs were used in the practicals in this scene from Skyfall? 

You previously mentioned that you used fluorescent tubes that were 4000k, so it looks like the practical bulbs were same CT, just curious did you rate the camera at 3200 or 4000?

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/FE004630-DC44-4BCA-BF96-A714B266F26F.jpeg
Roger Deakins
1 month ago
Roger Deakins 1 month ago

I think those practical lamps held regular tungsten 60 watt bulbs as I wanted the contrast with the florescent tubes. The camera was rated at 3200K so the end result is a little cool.

CameraKnapp
1 month ago

Interesting how the highlights in nearly all your films are always slightly cream in colour. How exactly do you achieve this in the DI?

JeeBoo
1 month ago

Thank you Roger!

Roger Deakins
1 month ago
Roger Deakins 1 month ago

I don't do anything specific to the highlights in the DI.

CameraKnapp
1 month ago

So it must be something EFilm did when they created your custom LUT?

Roger Deakins
1 month ago
Roger Deakins 1 month ago

I'm not sure why you think the highlights had to be adjusted in the DI. I shoot and expose just as I would shooting film and my LUT is equivalent to a print stock.

CameraKnapp
1 month ago

I assumed that the highlights had to be adjusted because the colour that your print stock LUT seems to render white highlights over 85+ IRE, seems to be cream... Which I love and would like to try figure out how I can create my own LUT (or DI timing) that renders highlights the same. I am not familiar with how print stocks, or most film stocks for that matter, render bright highlights, so I apologies for assuming this was done in the DI.
Can I ask which print stock this LUT is equivalent to and how you or EFilm recreated the colour of this print stock into a LUT.

simon m
1 month ago

Roger mentioned that the bulbs were 60W tungsten, and the camera was set to 3200K. As most tungsten bulbs emit light at about 2800K or so, this would cause the light from those fixtures to appear slightly warm, or creamy as you say. The more he dimmed them down, the warmer they would get.

Roger Deakins
1 month ago
Roger Deakins 1 month ago

We didn't set a LUT to match a particular film stock.

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