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Skin color reduction (5 replies and 6 comments)

GongZhikun
1 week ago
GongZhikun 1 week ago

Master Roger!
How to deal with the restoration of the skin color of actors in the environment of colored light?
The skin color of Asians is yellow, and when I shoot a scene with a dusk atmosphere, the yellow light shines on the character's face, resulting in a very red complexion on the actor's face, which has this effect in warm colors.
How can I mitigate this effect and what do I need to pay attention to in the lighting?
This kind of problem occurs in the following homework that I shoot.
Thank you for your guidance!

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/微信截图_20190909205127.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/微信截图_20190909204543.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/微信截图_20190909202937.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/微信截图_20190909202439.png
Roger Deakins
1 week ago
Roger Deakins 1 week ago

First off I want to ask if that color is actually 'wrong'. A warm light will give this effect on warm skin but is this shift being unnaturally exaggerated by the camera you are using?

GongZhikun
6 days ago

Yes, Master Roger, this effect is sure to occur when warm light shines on warm skin.
In fact, I just want to do a big gap between light and dark dusk effect.
I think the warm light in the environment is enough, but the character's face is more saturated because of the low brightness of the warm color.
The color of a person's face is stronger than the warm color around him and does not look very comfortable.
The camera I use will be a little reddish in this area of warm color. The white balance I use is 5600K. The simulated dusk light and indoor artificial light are made of 3200K tungsten filament lamp.
I want to keep the environment warm, but the actor's face is white balanced and retains the true complexion of his face.
This is a little difficult for me. Should I rely on DI, Master Roger?

Roger Deakins
6 days ago
Roger Deakins 6 days ago

It does sound like you will need to make that kind of adjustment in the DI. I don't see how it would be possible 'in camera'.

GongZhikun
6 days ago

Yes, sir!

Hans
5 days ago
Hans 5 days ago

You could do some testing with additional IR filtration. Real tungsten light produces up to 85% Infrared. 
If it's LED lamps that you're using, they could just have a bad spectrum. 

GongZhikun
3 days ago

Indeed, it is worth trying.
Thank you

Hans
3 days ago

I also recommend to try a 80C (blue) filter. It addresses both: color temperature and IR Pollution. The downside is you loose 1 stop sensitivity.

Hans
5 days ago
Hans 5 days ago

What camera you are using? 

GongZhikun
3 days ago

It is a 4K camera made in China provided by the school.
KINEFINITY TERRA 4K and SIGMA 18-35mm lenses.

Nan Li
3 days ago
Nan Li 3 days ago

You were using 5600k on your camera which definitely will make the faces look very yellow while the key light is from the tungsten light obviously. To me, this is not right from the beginning when you designed the look. 

From your picture, it's quite obvious this is daytime. I dont think the practical light in the room can against the daylight from the window. Even if it is possible in reality, it's not a good choice for your image. If I were you, I would use the daylight from the window to establish the key light then it matches the Color temp on your camera.

If you were setting up a night scene then first your lighting ratio is not right. The light outside of the window is too harsh that audience cannot identify daytime or night time. Anyway, if it's a night time then you are supposed to set your camera at 3200k more or less depends on your look but definitely not 5600k

Im a Chinese btw, you can add my Wechat: 68345

GongZhikun
9 hours ago

Yes, you are quite right.
I was wrong when I designed the scene.
It's a pleasure to meet you!

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