Lighting

Over exposed windows (11 replies and 1 comment)

Limbo
7 months ago
Limbo 7 months ago

Hi Roger,

I find some of your window shots over-exposed to lose details outside. However, when I put the image in false color, it shows the overexposed parts are only around 70 IRE. 

I wonder how did you achieve this effects. And why are they always has a creamy looking?

Thanks!

 

Limbo
7 months ago
Limbo 7 months ago

Here are the pics

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Snip20180225_15.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Snip20180225_14.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Snip20180224_13.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Snip20180224_12.png
shenzo
7 months ago
shenzo 7 months ago

Not answering for Roger here but it has to do with where you place the highlights. You can place them 'wherever' you want in your exposure depending on the effect you are after. Here they are placed about 2 stops above exposure. So the windows are actually not blowing out but only looking as if they are, which accounts for the creamy/warm color as opposed to clipping to white. What we see is outside the windows is the actual bounce or diffusion.

Limbo
7 months ago
Limbo 7 months ago

But looking at the picture with the woman, the objects near the window have already lost details. They have to be at least like 5-6 stops for an Alexa to overexpose as such, right?

And I assume the whole scene is mainly lit by the window, if the main source is the bounce or the diffusion and we are seeing them, they probably shouldn’t be just 2 stops higher.

David M
7 months ago

I don’t know Roger’s technique, but what you’re describing could and is often easily done in post to achieve a specific look, both with keeping the darkest parts of the image above true black and likewise keeping the highlights a bit under full white after the fact.

shenzo
7 months ago
shenzo 7 months ago

The duck near the window is yellow, in plastic and close to the source of light so its reflectance make it appear to have merged with the source outside the window. It is not clipping to white per se (as we can see in the false color) which is what losing details in the highlights refers to.

I would also think that is the only source, with a bounce on the wall facing the actress that is taking what comes from the window. +2 stops seems right to me though, above where Roger chose to place his exposure. Also the rest of the scene is more in the shadows and in effect make the highlights appear brighter. But then it's only conjectures from the finished image. So we might as well wait for Roger!

simon m
7 months ago
simon m 7 months ago

Somewhere in the 'lighting' section, Roger has gone over this scene. He used diffusion(250 or 251) I think on the bedroom window. It diffuses the light and is translucent, producing the effect you're seeing.

Dawson Boyle
7 months ago
Dawson Boyle 7 months ago

Guys, yes the windows are blown out as they are the main light source, and yes diffusion is used, that creamy affect you are referring to is because the highlights in the color grade are leveled off to something that's off white, it's darker and has a bit of warmth too it.  That's why there is no information but the blown out area isn't white.

shenzo
7 months ago
shenzo 7 months ago

Don't think Roger would blow out the windows beyond the recordable range and bring them back down in post... He would have the ability to control the light output of his bounce/diffusion with scrims on set and certainly would know where he wanted his highlights in the first place.

Roger Deakins
7 months ago
Roger Deakins 7 months ago

I have adjusted a window in the DI suite a time or two but for the most part I balance the lighting on set, which is certainly true for the images you post. They were exposed exactly as you see them. 

Limbo
6 months ago
Limbo 6 months ago

Then in those images, what are we seeing outside the window? Was it diffusion on the window or bounce board outside or barely just overexposed outside sceneries? 

Roger Deakins
6 months ago
Roger Deakins 6 months ago

In those instances you are seeing the overexposed wall or the courtyard opposite the window.

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