Lighting

Nostalgic, warm sun drenched garage help (7 replies and 2 comments)

Tom Cheater
4 days ago
Tom Cheater 4 days ago

Hi Roger and friends

im shooting a nostalgic ode to the hovis and budweiser ads of old spec about the birth of a motorcycle company and our first hot takes place in this garage

 

what i want to achieve is a dusty hazy look with some defined bright sunbeams coming through the window in the back aiming at the centre of the space that kinda fall off as they hit the floor?

 

what kind of lamps would i need (speicfic models if possible!) to achieve this and how best to go for the dusty, warm feeling of motorcycle enthusiasts garage in the 80s?

 

many thanks as always look forward to the ideas

 

*note* everything but the motorbike and tools in the background on the wall will be removed, a rough tarp will be put underneath the bike too in a dull green colour.

 

Tom-

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/TC011963.jpg
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/TC011962.jpg
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Tom Cheater
4 days ago
Tom Cheater 4 days ago

apologies for spelling mistakes

 

first shot* takes place in this garage

 

sirilesh
4 days ago
sirilesh 4 days ago

Hi this is sirilesh if want to take my suggestion or not its your wish .pushing light from the window need more lamps so better go with practical light by blocking the window and you can push daylight from the ventilator if you want by adding haze to it to get early morning look

Thankyou

Wouter
3 days ago
Wouter 3 days ago

you want the bike to be silhouetted against the haze that is lit up by the sunbeams? 

Morning sunbeams might not work in a backlight situation because the angle might be too parallel to the ground if you know what I mean. You need a pretty sharp, high up angle so you can actually see them. Unless of course the wide shot is not perpendicular to the back wall AND the light you're punching through that back windows is not perpendicular to the wall either. 

So that from the POV of the wide shot, the beams are going a bit sideways you know? Like a 3/4 backlight. This will also create a nice edge light on the bike. 

Another option (I think this might be the easiest one) is to punch the light through the window on the right.. creating a side light on the bike. Playing around with the angle and positioning of the light as well as the placement of the bike in the room will be the most important thing. 

I would suggest you'd plan this into the schedule to make sure you have enough time to play around with it to get it just right. 

Wouter
3 days ago
Wouter 3 days ago

you see from this illustration from Roger's work, the beams have to be at some sort of an angle to be able to see them.. if they are directly backlighting and the angle is like a low, morning sun, you'll just end up flaring the lens mostly 🙂 

Wouter
3 days ago
Wouter
3 days ago

Also, look at the floor! There is an amazing shadowy opportunity for you there 🙂
Maybe you'll want to catch it 🙂

Good luck!

Tom Cheater
3 days ago
Tom Cheater 3 days ago

thanks guys all really great, must not of explained myself but i want the window in shot and motivated so the beams will come from there, total whiteout with the beams defined through in the wide master if that makes sense

Mike
3 days ago
Mike 3 days ago

Tom,

Not sure if you are shooting stills or movie but your brief that you are looking for a shot of a 1980's garage and an image of The beginnings of a 'motorcycle company' seem contradictive, it's one or the other IMO. But I can see where you are going, I think?

A 1980's garage will be a well lit workspace contrary to a 1900's garage where I think you want to be, you are looking for that misty/smokey atmosphere of a yesteryear workshop where perhaps a new type motorcycle is put together or created!  Those Wright Bros type workshops did actually exist but are hard to photograph as you need a number of props to make them authentic. Faking the shots without the genuine props never really look good.

it all depends on the premise of the story, is the motorcycle the 'star' then try and light the bike to show off its lines and emphasise the parts that reflect light. eg. Chromed parts etc.

Would be a great help if you explained the set up, budget, existing equipment etc You can achieve good results with just two 650 watts for the windows and light smoke then play around with gels etc. Even use a couple of house lamps to highlight the selling points.

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Tom Cheater
3 days ago
Tom Cheater 3 days ago

ive really not explained this well thats my bad, its a home garage, in the 80s and the action is two boys are messing around with their fathers motorbike trying to learn it and taking things of and on it and playing with tools etc, the opening master is a creep in from the driveway and i wanted some beams coming in from the window to the right and have the general atmosphere all dusty and hazy and warm. 

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