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INT. NIGHT. BRIGHT ROOM (2 replies and 1 comment)

ibzen
3 months ago
ibzen 3 months ago

Hallo, 

I'm working on a production where I will try to create a mood of bright INT. light at night, where nothing is hidden in darkness. Don't know if it's gonna feel unauthentic but I really like the lighting in 'Let the right one in' and thought it would fit the story I'm making. 

Any one having experience or thoughts about how to think of this? 

Best wishes

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Screenshot-2020-11-24-at-15.43.56.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Screenshot-2020-11-24-at-15.43.14.png
Jacob W.
3 months ago
Jacob W. 3 months ago

Lots of bounces and soft lights. I've seen David Sandberg use really cheap $5 Ikea hanging paper lanterns then stick a headlamp or a small clip light inside to get a really nice soft light. A few of those around the room might give you that soft lighting. And they weigh nothing you can hang them anywhere and easily move them to camera for each shot. 

That and a white sheet on the floor to bounce some shadows away could potentially give you that look?

An expert might be able to weigh in with better info, but without being there it's going to be trial and error and just play around with it on the day. But those soft lights will be fun to work with and again, super cheap.

Best of luck. Hope this helps.

G.C.
3 months ago
G.C. 3 months ago

Hey! Indie gaffer here.

both your references feature two things: a soft top light, and some sort of window or door that leads into darkness.
For your top light, many solutions are available, but the idea is that it has to be as large and shallow as possible and remain off the walls. You can use litemats on the ceiling through a diffusion with a litetools grid, and skirts. Alternatively, for cheaper, you can use a Chinese lantern ; however that will give you slightly harder shadows and it will not be as tight to the ceiling.

Then don’t turn on any practicals, and make sure you leave that door or window dark (or cleanly blacked out).

G.C.
3 months ago

And in fact, if you have a camera that can handle low light, you could also just use a large, frosted bulb as well.

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