Lighting

Posted on by
Back to Lighting...

How to deal/avoid windows glare? (1 reply and 4 comments)

MaxA.
1 month ago
MaxA. 1 month ago

Hello Mr. Deakins and all the Dp's over this fantastic forum, I really like frames and compositions with strong light sources in the scene, like blown-out windows, but sometimes I'm "afraid" and ask myself if this kind of situation can give me an "uncontrollable" glare in some situations where I think that is not necessary.

If so, how could I deal with this kind of situation and let that the "right" amount of light comes into my ambiance without gives me soft halation all around the frame (or at least to limit this event)?

I might think, for instance, that is all about the angle between the bounce surface and lamp (when is bounce source outside windows), so maybe a 45° angle of the bounce surface or the angle of the lamp could limit this issue, or I'm totally wrong about it?

Your experience is solid like stone and advice from you are really powerful for me as an aspiring without so much experience.

I attach some examples from your shots and would ask you how did you deal with the lighting to avoid the "glare" issue.

I hope that my English was good enough to explain my doubt. As usual, thank you very much for your availability, I wish you a nice day!
Max.

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Skyfall.jpg
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/The-assassin..jpg
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Prison2.jpg
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Prison..jpg
dmullenasc
1 month ago
dmullenasc 1 month ago

What you are really talking about here is veiling flare as it relates to a large bright source in the frame -- the main thing is to use a higher-contrast prime lens with minimal to no flare, like a Zeiss Master Prime.

MaxA.
1 month ago

Hello Mr. Mullen, yes, my concern is about large bright sources in the frame. Thank you very much for your clarification and advice, I will research some kinds of lenses that carry a high contrast level when it's not possible to afford the Zeiss master primes.

Thank you again and have a nice day.
Max.

The Byre
1 month ago

Cannon and Xeen make excellent prime lenses and I found the following video comparing the two - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHuxyP9WS_M». The Xeens are very underrated and I prefer them over Cannons, Zeis and Cookes (those are the ones I have tried) and many others. They have low flares, no nasty stars and very low breathing and are just sharper and clearer. If Arri Signature Primes are out of the budget, Xeens are a genuinely good alternative, despite their absurdly low price.

MaxA.
1 month ago

Hi! Thank you for your answer. I already consider the xeen but the CF series (cause the project is very low budget and we need to be a bit more light) so It's good that those have a good amount of contrast for that scenario.
Thank you again for your clarification!
Have a nice weekend.
Max.

The Byre
1 month ago

I have no experience with the CF series, but I assume that the glass in them is the same as the regular series, in which case it is very good - better than Zeis. I have the full set from 14 to 85 and (after doing a comparison with Cannon, Zeis, Cooke and others, though I have forgotten which brands) I came to the conclusion that with a few notable exceptions at the very top of any price range, lens quality seems to be inversely proportionate to their price. The cheaper they are, the better they perform!
The Cannons at about $3,000 each and the Xeens at about half that price performed best for bokeh and flares, though of course anything below opening them up below 2 and looking at a single strong light head-on gave problems for all the lenses I tried.
I also have some budget-priced Leica zooms for run-n-gun work that knock spots off the expensive brands!
Sadly, I have to work this weekend, finishing off some TV programme edits.

Back to Lighting...