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Eyelights in No Time To Die (3 replies and 3 comments)

Sjoerdwess
1 month ago
Sjoerdwess 1 month ago

Hi everyone! 

I've done a bit of research on this forum about creating eye lights. The technique seems to be clear to me. However, I'm left with some questions. 

Yesterday I've seen the new Bond film. One thing that caught my eye (tadummm) was the eye lights used in darker scenes. Sometimes a strong contrast ratio was present, yet still, there was an eye light in the dark-side eye. This is, of course, was created with a small light to mirror in the eye. But how on earth do you create this without the light spilling on the face or creating a weird fill. 

Thanks a lot for your reply! Can't wait to get more insight in this topic. 

Best,
Sjoerd

 

Mike
1 month ago
Mike 1 month ago

I have not seen the film but there are many ways to achieve this effect. One way is using a “Snoot” they come in various sizes and actually date back to the 1920’s and were commonly used in live Theatre and even Photographic studios. LED’s can also be fine tuned to give that effect.

Sjoerdwess
1 month ago

Mike! Thanks a lot! Snoot is a smart idea. Whenever the film comes online, I'll report back with the frame I mean.
Thanks!

Mike
1 month ago

Please do!

Mike
1 month ago
Mike 1 month ago

“No time to die” JB lighting effects.

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/E856CA8A-6A0E-4A63-B0F7-B246CDABE649.png
dmullenasc
1 month ago
dmullenasc 1 month ago

The eyes are highly reflective so will reflect a light that is fairly dim, but also distance matters -- imagine a long room with a mirror at one end and a little light at the other end - the light will be reflected in the mirror even though the distance means that the light won't be adding much exposure to the mirror. So the same small on-camera eyelight will add more exposure if the camera is two feet from the face instead of four feet from the face, but it won't necessarily be half as bright as a reflection at four feet instead of two feet.
Another thing that matters is contrast of the digital color-correction or the print, adding more contrast in post tends to cause shadow detail to drop off faster but highlights to get hotter, and a reflection in an eye is a highlight, not a shadow. Look at this frame from the 60's b&w movie "Onibaba" -- the contrast of the b&w stock meant that the eyelight reflection reads well but there is very little shadow detail.

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Screen-Shot-2021-10-03-at-2.26.20-PM.jpg
Sjoerdwess
1 month ago

David, it's an honour getting this reply from you! I admire your work!

It definitely makes sense and this will be something I'm trying out this weekend. I really like the clear examples you've given!

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