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The cinematography of Blade Runner 2049 (2 replies and 1 comment)

Abou18
7 days ago
Abou18 7 days ago

Hello Mr. Deakins,

Although your cinematography is quite minimalist, from the compositions, the lighting, and the use of color and camera movements, I think that Blade Runner 2049 is your most noticeably beatiful film. Every frame is a painting and it truly stands out in comparison to other films. Therefore I was wondering, since you say that the best cinematography never gets noticed, is this your worse work?

Roger Deakins
5 days ago
Roger Deakins 5 days ago

You may well be right though I wouldn't say it 'stands out' particularly. There are certainly other film that I am more satisfied with in terms of my personal contribution. Whether they are 'better' shot is purely subjective. I would say some were but, obviously, other might disagree.

Abou18
5 days ago

Which films are you more satisfied with? It's funny that after so many nominations, it is your most "noticeably beautiful" film that ended up winning you an oscar. In your opinion what is your best work to date?

jthomsg
5 days ago
jthomsg 5 days ago

I saw the film numerous times when it played in theaters, they even brought the film back in the holidays for an entire week after it stopped playing. I went to a morning screening around November and I was the only person in the theater. It's a shame so many people miss out on films that are ahead of their time and have great visual poetry. The same thing happened to another great masterpiece called 'The Master', which only played in theaters for one week. 

When I saw the film, the lighting never stood out, it was just different than any other sci-fi film ever made. I mean who makes a sci-fi film where there is hardly any action and loud explosions? Sadly, that's what everyone looks for in a movie nowadays, if it doesn't have massive sequences like Pacific Rim or any other JJ Abrhams piece of crap, then nobody goes to see it.

I thought the lighting reflected Officer K's state of mind. The subdued bluish, overcast look, we could tell he was caged in some kind mental prison. When we see him looking out into the post-apocalyptic Vegas landscape, the orange light felt like a moment of enlightenment, his pathway to truth. At least that's what it meant to me. It's funny how most films take a lot from 'The Wizard of Oz', just think about the journey of the yellow brick road, and the disappointment of discovering that the Wizard of Oz was nothing but a fraud. I think K felt the same way in his journey, the disappointment when he sees that massive pink hologram of Joi. It's a beautiful film. 

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=JfauI79%2f&id=7BF99A52C98DD0E52B77B60DB7BD320D74D21F22&thid=OIP.JfauI79_kJMOjfIAPRsEGAHaEJ&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2f4.bp.blogspot.com%2f-fbIFxUZTAHQ%2fWd_hlwSL8EI%2fAAAAAAAASgc%2fsI-mluFMqlgjcen3Mx8lwfy48en8wpONgCLcBGAs%2fs1600%2fblade_runner2049.gif&exph=408&expw=728&q=blade+runner+2049+joi+hologram&simid=607995083057400300&selectedIndex=54&ajaxhist=0 »

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