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Sicario Composition Questions (5 replies and 6 comments)

chickichacka
2 weeks ago
chickichacka 2 weeks ago

I am curious as to what thoughts were put into, or how it is essential to the story, shots like when Silvio leaves the house with his son in the first scene where he is introduced. Where the camera remains in the house and we see Silvio and his son leaving through the windows. Also the shot when we see Kate through a thin curtain when the Medellin pays her a last visit.

chickichacka
2 weeks ago
chickichacka 2 weeks ago

here are the screenshots

 

https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/스크린샷-2017-08-09-오후-11.11.47.png
https://www.rogerdeakins.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/스크린샷-2017-08-09-오후-11.12.11.png
rlandry1
2 weeks ago

First off, as the viewer, we are being shut in, and our limited vision of the outside world suggests that this is a place we don't belong or that we cannot or dare not go.

With the first image, I think the dark interior we are peering out from suggests the perspective of someone being left behind, perhaps the officer's wife's perspective is the closest we identify with.

That said, we empathize with the wife's emotional feeling of watching her husband leave to venture back into a dangerous world where he may or may not return.

The dark framing lines almost always symbolize prison bars, or a sort of barrier. Whether these "bars" are keeping things in or out is where it gets more subjective.

Notice that there is a whole in the window to the left with a taped over covering. This is more than likely damage from a gunshot or some sort of projectile having been thrown (shot) at it. This suggests, that perhaps this officer of the law is looked down upon and that not only is he in danger, but that the danger is seeping into his familial environment, which suggests that no-one is really "safe."

The use of curtains and veils is a motif in this film I believe. They are often used to reinforce the barrier symbol. However, I also feel they have a religious connotation to them. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it reminds me of the little holy shrines that you often find in the homes and sometimes on the sides of roads and streets in Mexico.

*I spent most of my childhood in the state of Veracruz Mexico. So I am very familiar with the intricate cultural details of the country.

chickichacka
1 week ago

thank you too! rlandry!

Roger Deakins
2 weeks ago
Roger Deakins 2 weeks ago

That last shot of Emily was to give a sense of foreboding and that there might be someone watching her, which there was.

rlandry1
2 weeks ago

Sooooo.... nailed it. Haha!

rlandry1
2 weeks ago

When you look at other people's photography, do you find yourself directing it or trying to understand it in an introspective way? For instance, it is said that the reason we "read" is so that we can learn about others lives and inso doing, learn about ourselves.

Does cinema do the same?

Do you think there is any merit in incorporating these types of intellectual ideas into your process or do you think this should be left up to the writers and directors?

Roger Deakins
2 weeks ago
Roger Deakins 2 weeks ago

I believe images can have great power. I am deeply moved by much of Edvard Munch's work but I don't listen to the museum 'guide track' when I view one of his paintings. I believe both appreciating and creating an image is more about 'the gut' than the head.

chickichacka
1 week ago

thank you!!

B
1 week ago
B 1 week ago

Would you say that appreciating a film as a whole is more about the gut than the head? Or does that start to become a little more analytical when talking about an entire film?

rlandry1
1 week ago

I think some movies are. It depends on a many different contributing factors. For instance, what is your emotional level at when viewing a certain film? If you are Super stressed, and you go see a comedy, naturally you will either love the film because hit helped releive your stress OR you did not care for it due to the fact that your stress was not relieved or possibly worsened in some way.

I always remember an interview with Woody Allen saying that the first time he saw 2001: A Space Odyssey, he did not like it. But after watching it a second and then a third time, he gradually understood its brilliance.

So, yes, I do believe some things can be understood from the spirit or "the gut" as you say, but I think it depends on the person. It doesn't necessarily mean that you shouldn't give certain films a second viewing.

Roger Deakins
1 week ago
Roger Deakins 1 week ago

I think there is a time to analyze a film but the first viewing of a film is not that time. When I am shooting I certainly analyze the script and consider how to interpret it visually but it is my 'gut', or instinct, which plays the primary role.

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