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SHUTTER SPEED TO USE IF SHOOTING 50P OR 60P contreversy ? (3 replies and 3 comments)

DomSim
1 month ago
DomSim 1 month ago

I always learn that we had to apply the rule of 180 degree shutter even on a digital camera but after going to a workshop I find out that it is maybe not the case into the digital camera world ? 

The sentence below is not from me but from the person who seem to have some good knowledge. 

 (There is no reason why you can’t use a 1/50th or 1/60th shutter when shooting at 50fps or 60fps, especially if you don’t have a lot of light to work with. 1/50(1/60) at 50fps(60fps) will give you the smoothest motion as there are no breaks in the motion between each frame.)

I did some fast test since  ( i did not go really tech into it yet  ) and so far it seems that  what every tutorials are not accurate since at 60 fps and a 1/50 shutter speed the image in slow motion was looking the same as  the one I got at 24 fps 1/50 so that would suggest that I could shoot at 60 fps or 120 fps with a 1/50 and still get the image i like instead of bumping my shutter speed if I dont need to ? Thank you 

 

 

dmullenasc
1 month ago
dmullenasc 1 month ago

You can’t take a picture 60 times a second and have a shutter time longer than 1/60th of a second per picture. Think about it.

As for, let’s say, shooting at 50P with a 1/50th shutter and converting it to 25P by dropping every other frame, it would look the same as if you shot at 25P with a 1/50th shutter.

But the slow-motion version from playing the 50P footage back at 25P would have twice as much motion blur compared to a traditional 50P shot with a 1/100th shutter time (180 degree shutter). It’s a bit smeary-looking as far as a slow-motion effect goes compared to how we are used to seeing slow-motion shots.

dmullenasc
1 month ago

You can test this yourself but I think you'll find that there is no free lunch -- shooting a 50 fps with a 360 degree shutter for slow-motion because it saves you the 1-stop exposure loss will result in a sort of smeared-motion effect that feels un-film-like, more like classic video. On the other hand, for scenes with very little motion (typically not a slow-motion moment though) like two people talking in a dimly-lit bar or something, you can sometimes get away with longer shutter times, like a 240 degree shutter instead of a 180 degree shutter.

Roger Deakins
1 month ago
Roger Deakins 1 month ago

David! You are so brilliant at explaining these things! Thank you!

DomSim
1 month ago
DomSim 1 month ago

Thank you gentlemen,

 

Like I said before I always applied the 180 but was a bit confuse after a Sony workshop with Alister Chapman since he had mention that the 180 degree shutter doesnt apply for a digital camera. So I was curious to see if anybody else had tested this avenue.

This info is from his blog xd cam-user :(Shooting with a shutter speed that is half the duration of the cameras frame rate is also know as using a 180 degree shutter, a very necessary practice with a film movie camera due to the way the mechanical shutter must be closed while the film is physically advanced to the next frame. But it isn’t essential that you have the closed shutter period with an electronic camera as there is no film to move, so you don’t have to use a 180 degree shutter if you don’t want to.)

dmullenasc
1 month ago

The shutter "angle" in most digital cameras (unless they have an optical viewfinder system, which is rare) is just a way of selecting an electronic shutter time that is connected to the frame rate rather than independent of the frame rate. No, you don't have to use it, but it helps if you want a classic film-like motion reproduction.

DomSim
1 month ago

Thank you David !

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