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1917- Panning shots inducing slight dizziness ? (5 replies and 10 comments)

Ashwin A
4 weeks ago
Ashwin A 4 weeks ago

Got to watch 1917 yesterday here in India in IMAX, it was one of the most immersive cinematic experience ever. Although we had a slight issues with couple of shots mostly wider shots involving larger panning angles which was inducing a slight dizziness. Is it because of the speed at which it was panned or was it  isolated theater issue ( i kind of asked a few people, who had seen this in other IMAX having similar issues as well). Any body else felt it here ? I am myself a practicing cinematographer and have not yet got the opportunity to use Trinity and one of the main reasons i feel that there is a trade off  when there is a choice of choosing a gimbel and a steadicam is the motorized readjustment speed which feels a little unnatural especially in panning. This was hardly noticeable in this film. Would love to hear your views.. 

Mike
4 weeks ago
Mike 4 weeks ago

I noticed on some scenes that the outside of the lens was travelling faster that the centre view but did not feel nauseous. Ofcourse, this is normal for a wide lens in that situation.

What did you think of the film as a whole.

Ashwin A
4 weeks ago

I loved the film, needless to say i had my reservations on how the single take would just stand out but to my surprise it serves it so well that i was lost in the film. Truly a remarkable feat. One more reason i think it works so well is there is a very remarkable visual design to this film, like a constant shift from different magnifications according to each and every scene.

Mike
4 weeks ago

It is certainly a remarkable film in terms of the photography but what did you think of the storyline, was it up to your expectations.

Ashwin A
4 weeks ago

I really loved the experience of the film, it was unique and it serves the purpose. I wouldn't say its my favorite war film though. I like the ones where there are characters which slowly gets revealed to us in time, not doing a comparison though, here because of the immersive continuous flow of the film in real time we are involved in an altogether visceral environment of war which gives us a different experience. My favorite war film would be Jarhead for all the same reasons.

David W
4 weeks ago
David W 4 weeks ago

I noticed objects in the frame would almost visually buzz and shake a little on slow pans which were distracting. Is this something you noticed as well?

Ashwin A
4 weeks ago

I think its the visual buzz that i think is the one i am talking about..i didn't notice any shakes though.

David W
4 weeks ago

Yes, shakes was the wrong word, but definitely buzzing.

Roger Deakins
4 weeks ago
Roger Deakins 4 weeks ago

The 40mm is hardly a wide lens. I don't understand how the outside of the lens would be traveling faster than the center. Is that optically possible? The IMAX screen itself brings in image distortion and I am sure this is what you are feeling. My suggesting would be to watch the film in 2:40, which is what it was primarily filmed for.

The Trinity rig and the 'motorized adjustment speed'. What is actually meant by that phrase in connection with the Trinity, which is operated in much the same way as a Steadicam. The pan is being controlled by the operator who is carrying it and is not 'motorized'. I was operating the tilt remotely, so that is motorized, but you were referring to panning.

There were only three pans in the film that I think you can be referring to  and each of these was done with a combination of camera rigs. One is a combination of a pan on a Stablileye remote head combined with a pan made on a Trinity. One is a combination of a pan on a Stabileye remote head and a Steadicam pan. And one is a combination of a pan on a Stabileye remote head with a pan on a Libra Mini remote head.

Ashwin A
4 weeks ago

Yes i think it could be the IMAX screen that brings it in, would definitely try it on a 2:40.
Yes i was a bit confused with the working of Trinity , thought it had a similar mode in terms of Ronin Gimbels.
Thanks for the info on the pans , that's quite a combination of camera rigs.I must say that it really blends well within the shots..I wonder with all those invisible shots being blended, how were you able to match the speed of these shots with next shot. Was it fine tuned in the edit table or was there a way to precise the speed during the shoot?

Mike
4 weeks ago

Roger,
Did you use the 40mm all the way through. I read an article somewhere, sorry just cannot remember where exactly that you used 18 mm Hasselblad/ Zeiss lens on some scenes perhaps you were experimenting or testing various lenses when you were prepping. I regard the 18 as a wide lens and thought you may have used it following the two soldiers over “Now Mans land” as I did notice some distortion at the edges of the frame but maybe it was the large screen. The camera was very close up the backsides of the soldiers so thought you were using an Ultra wide lens.

Mike
4 weeks ago

ENG cameras and lenses range from 5.5 - 17mm and certainly have major distortion on the edges, the image is stretched at the edges and movement is exaggerated due to the glass is much thinner towards the edge than the centre of the glass plug.
Lens design and manufacture is a science and every lens behaves differently but in general wide lenses tend to bend the frame edge which can be very effective especially when used in large format photography.

Roger Deakins
4 weeks ago
Roger Deakins 4 weeks ago

The Trinity is a little different to a Ronin as it is operated more like a Steadicam. It is only the tilt axis that is motorized and can be operated remotely. The sensitivity that can be achieved by a really good operator, such as we had in Charlie Rizek, makes it preferable over a stabilized remote head for more delicate work, in my opinion.

We always had playback of a preferred take to match to but there were also some adjustments made in post. We saw a 'cut' of the film a week after we finished shooting and most of the 'joins' were pretty smooth.

Ashwin A
4 weeks ago

Thanks for the feedback Sir. Once again congratulations for the amazing works that keeps inspiring us!!

Roger Deakins
4 weeks ago
Roger Deakins 4 weeks ago

Yes, and 18mm will 'bow' but almost every frame of '1917' was shot on a 40mm. There is so much disinformation out there! And not restricted to this film. There is about no distortion on the 40mm Signature Prime lens.

Mike
4 weeks ago

Journalists will write anything just to fill their weekly quota not caring whether it will damaged someone’s reputation or not, they prefer ‘gossip’ over facts as that is more sellable for the tabloids. Truth will always prevail in the end but sometimes too late to be effective. No smoke without fire syndrome.

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